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Adopt A Species

TAKE A LOOK AT OUR ADOPTABLE ANIMALS

Click on an animal to read some interesting facts about each one and view more photos.

WHAT'S INCLUDED

Adorable Plush
Official Adoption Certificate
5 x 7 Photo
Animal Fact Sheet

Bald Eagle

Cougar

Gray Wolf

Grizzly Bear

Out of Stock

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Bald Eagle

Bald eagles are good swimmers. If a bald eagle latches on to a fish too heavy to lift out of the water, it may swim a great distance to shore, dragging the fish onto land to eat it.

When migrating, they can reach gliding speeds of up to 75 miles per hour. And they can fly up to 10,000 feet.

Bald eagles were once endangered, but due to a major conservation effort across the U.S. they were removed from the Federal List of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife in 2007.

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Cougar

Cougars are usually solitary, stalking and sometimes ambushing their prey.

Their territory can stretch up to 350 square miles or more, depending on availability of large prey.

Cougars are powerful runners, leapers and climbers, adapted to habitat from forest to desert.

They are very vocal, producing a variety of screams, growls, mews, hisses and even a purr like a housecat – but louder.

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Gray Wolf

Wolves live and hunt in a pack that is structured socially in class layers, with an alpha male and female at the top. The alpha female is the only one to give birth.

Wolves communicate visually in sophisticated ways, using body posture, facial expressions and tail positions. Audible communication is the howl, which bonds the pack, helps them reassemble and is sometimes just for play.

Wolves are naturally wary of humans and prefer to flee or avoid them if possible

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Grizzly Bear

Grizzlies are one of the largest terrestrial predators in North America, with blond, brown or black fur and silver guard hairs that give them their common name.

Grizzly bears live in remote areas of Montana, Wyoming, Idaho, Washington, southwest Canada and Alaska. They’re endangered in Washington, with only a handful left.

A bear’s most important senses are smell and hearing. Young cubs can climb trees, but adults get too big.

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